Course Descriptions for those entering prior to Fall 2015

 

Department of Pharmaceutics

 

PHA 5100 Dosage Forms I. Fall semester. Credits : 3; Prerequisites: PD classification. PHA 5110 is designed to be an integrative course on physical pharmacy principles, as well as traditional and novel pharmaceutical dosage forms. The purpose of the course is to give the student insight into dosage form selection and use based on a strong foundation in the physical sciences. Pharmaceutical calculations, which are essential to ensure that the right dose and strength is given to the patient, is covered as a section of the course.

PHA 5101 Dosage Forms II. Spring semester. Credits: 2; Prerequisites: PD classification and completion of PHA 5110. This course is the continuation of PHA 5110. The purpose of the course is to introduce beginning pharmacy students to the technologic and scientific principles underlying the preparation of dosage forms and drug delivery systems and their use in patient care. Through an integrated presentation, students gain an understanding of the interrelationship between physical pharmacy principles and patient care.

PHA 5127 Basic Principles of Dose Optimization I. Fall semester. Credits: 2; Prerequisites: PD classification. This course is an introduction to the study of the time course of drugs in the body with reference to their absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination (ADME). Consideration is given to rate processes, the physiochemical influences on ADME, and formulation factors involved in drug delivery and availability. The student will apply these basic principles in the optimization of dosing regimens.

PHA 5128 Basic Principles of Dose Optimization II. Spring semester. Credits: 2; Prerequisites: PD classification; passing grade in PHA 5127. This course is the second course in a sequence of two courses on dose optimization based on pharmacokinetic principles. Students will learn how to integrate and apply pharmacokinetic principles in the formulation of rational dosage regimens and in adjustment of existing regimens. Special emphasis is given to patient factors such as disease states, age, gender and body weight, and drug and drug product factors such as formulation and drug interaction. The course includes an introduction to the knowledge and skills required in the use of pharmacokinetic principles in the selection and evaluation of drug therapy and in individualization of dosage regimens for particular patients.

PHA 5104 Dosage Forms and Contemporary Pharmacy Practice. Fall. Credits: 2; Prereq: PD classification. This course provides students with the opportunity to learn and utilize the theory, practice and issues underlying the extemporaneous preparation and administration of pharmaceutical dosage forms used in patient care. This will include traditional dosage forms, newer dosage forms and sterile dosage forms. The content in this course is integrated with the activities and skills utilized in the Pharmaceutical Skills Laboratories. This course utilizes a case-assisted instructional approach, traditional lectures, and a problem solving written assignment to provide students with the knowledge, skills and attitudes used for the extemporaneous preparation of dosage forms in contemporary pharmacy practice.

PHA 5451 Clinical Biochemistry, Fall Credits: 4;  Prerequisites: organic chemistry I and II; PD classification   The course provides a biochemical foundation for the understanding of drug action, drug absorption, and drug metabolism. Examples of the biochemical basis for different disease states  provide a framework in understanding cause of disease. There is an overlap between topics covered in Clinical Biochemistry and in Medicinal Chemistry. These should not be viewed as redundant but rather reinforcing the understanding of fundamental chemical principles regarding both Biochemistry and Drug Action.  At the end of each lecture on a set of topics, a clinical example or examples are presented that emphasize how that particular biochemical concept relates to disease or drug action.

PHA 5352 Herbal Medicines, Spring semester (last 8 weeks); Credits: 2; Prerequisites: PD classification.  This course is a practice-oriented introduction into herbal medicines. The course content provides students with information about botanical or herbal products that will allow them to make judgments about  clinical effectiveness and potential for adverse consequences in patients. Discussions of herbs will generally include the name of the herb, its source, common use, contraindications, side effects, interactions, dose, mode of administration, & mechanism of action (when known). Appropriate background for organ/system disorders & diseases will be sketched. The course will cover the following types of herbal medicines: St. John’s Wort, Echinacea, Garlic, Gingko, Ginseng, Black Cohosh, Saw palmetto, Milk thistle, Ginger, Cranberries, Kava and other herbal products of public interest. The course further gives an introduction into aspects related to safety, quality and efficacy of herbal medicinal products. This includes techniques for quality control of starting materials and finished products, assurances for batch to batch consistency, specification of concepts, and relevant international guidelines.

 

 

Department of Pharmacodynamics

 

PHA 5560C Physiological Basis of Disease I.  Fall Semester;  Credits: 5; Prerequisites: PD classification.  This course is the first of a two-course sequence that is designed to provide students with a solid understanding of the physiological functions of the human body and pathological malfunctions related to various human diseases at the molecular, cellular, organ, and organ system level.  The fall semester course will cover topics that include cell membrane and nerve cell communication, the immune system and related disorders, muscle function, cancer, neurochemistry and neurological disorders, sensory and brain ventricular system, and the cardiovascular system and disorders.  Emphasis is placed on the integration of knowledge at all levels pertinent to the health and disease of the individual.  This knowledge base will serve as foundation for the study of pharmacology and therapeutics.

PHA 5561C Physiological Basis of Disease II. Spring semester;  Credits: 5; Prerequisites: PD classification; passing grade in PHA 5560C (i.e., PBD I).  The spring semester course is the second of the two-course sequence that is designed to provide students with an integrated understanding of the physiology and pathology of the human body.  Topics that will be covered by the second course in the two-course series include functions and disorders of the digestive, renal, respiration and the endocrine systems, as well as hypertensive disorders.  Together with the fall semester course, this series of courses will serve to prepare students for the study of pharmacology and therapeutics.

MCB 5252 Microbiological and Immunological Basis for Therapy. Spring semester; Credits: 4; Prerequisites: PD classification. This course covers the functions of the immune system, immunological disease states, immunotherapeutics, bacteriology/antibiotics, parasitology, and virology with a medical orientation

 

PHA 5515 Basic Principles of Pharmacology. Spring semester; 1 credit; Prerequisites: PD classification; passing grade in PHA 5560C and concurrent registration for PHA 5561C. Pharmacology is the unified study of the properties of chemicals and living organisms and all aspects of their interaction.  This course is the first of a three course sequence (PHA 5515, 5516 and 5517) that is designed to introduce the student to mechanisms of drug action. This includes an understanding of: (1)   the location of the site of drug action; (2) the cellular or molecular mechanism of drug action; (3) the relationship between dose-response functions and biologic action (4) the fate of drugs in the body.

This course will provide a basis for the rational understanding of applied clinical pharmacology and therapeutics.  An understanding of mammalian physiology is presumed and is a prerequisite for this course.

 

PHA 5516 Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics I. Fall semester; 4 credits; Prerequisites. PD classification. This is the first of a two semester sequence that examines the pharmacological principles of chemicals used in therapeutics.  It deals with the site, molecular mechanism of action and major side effects of drugs affecting autonomic, cardiovascular, respiratory, and renal function as well as drugs affecting the central nervous system.  This course  provides the basis for the rational understanding of applied clinical pharmacology and therapeutics of drugs affecting these systems.

PHA 5517 Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics II. Spring semester; Credits: 4; Prerequisites: PD classification; passing grade in PHA 5516. The second semester continues examining the pharmacological principles of chemicals used in therapeutics.  It deals with the site, molecular mechanism of action and major side effects of drugs on pain, the endocrine system, as well as antibiotics and anticancer agents.  This provides the basis for the rational understanding of applied clinical pharmacology and therapeutics of drugs affecting these systems.

Department of Medicinal Chemistry

 

PHA5433 Fundamentals of Medicinal Chemistry. Fall semester; Credit: 1; Prerequisites: PD classification or approval of Department. This is the first course in a sequence of four Medicinal Chemistry courses. Students are shown how to analyze the contributions of organic functional groups to pKa, metabolism and receptor binding of drug molecules and to predict their effects on activity/potency.

PHA5436 Structure and Function of Nucleotides: Basis for Therapy. Spring semester; Credits 2; Prereq: PD classification or approval of Department. This is the second course in a sequence of four Medicinal Chemistry courses. Students are shown how to identify biochemical reactions and processes as targets for enhancement or inhibition by nucloside or nucleotide analogues and how to predict the therapeutic implications of such enhancement or inhibitions. In particular, anticancer and antiviral therapies are stressed.

PHA 5437 Medicinal Chemistry I. Fall. Credit: 3 ; Prerequisites: PD classification or approval of Department. This is the third course in a sequence of four Medicinal Chemistry courses. Students are shown how to predict solubility, metabolism, and pharmacological activity/potency of drug classes based on the contribution of their functional groups to their structures. In particular, anticoagulants, ACE inhibitors, glucocorticosteroids, nitrate esters, adrenergics, cholinergics, diuretics, anesthetics, antihyperlipidemics, muscle relaxants, anxiolytics, antidepressants, sedative hypnotics and fat soluble vitamins are covered.

PHA 5438 Medicinal Chemistry II. Spring semester; Credits: 3; Prerequisites: PD classification or approval of Department. This is the fourth in a sequence of four Medicinal Chemistry courses. Students are shown how to predict the solubility, metabolism, and pharmacological activity/potency of drug classes and individual members of classes based on the contribution of their functional groups to their structures. In particular analgesics, anticonvulsants, nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory drugs, H1 and H2 antagonists, antibiotics, anti-diabetics, and herbal remedies are covered.

Department of Pharmacotherapy  and Translational Research

 

 

PHA 5941C IPPE I. Fall semester; Credit: 1; Prerequisites: PD classification.  This laboratory type course introduces pharmacy students to patient care needs from health care system and sociological perspectives.  Students are assigned  in groups to interact with a volunteer patient.  Fundamental interview and physical assessment skills are introduced.  As a group, students conduct health care screenings in retail areas in the community under the supervision of pharmacists.  In addition, students present case studies that integrate subject matter from didactic courses in the first professional year.  Students also are assigned to shadow senior pharmacy students in patient care areas.

PHA 5942C IPPE II. Spring semester. Credit: I; Prerequisites: PD classification. Spring semester: Credit 1; Prerequisites: PD classification.  This is the second course in this sequence in which students continue the same activities as described in Practicum I in the same group assigned at the beginning of the academic year.

PHA 5943C IPPE III. Fall semester: Credit: 1; Prerequisites: PD classification. Fall semester. Credit I: Prerequisites PD classification.  This course provides introductory pharmacy experiences for students in either community pharmacy stores or hospital pharmacy operations.  Students are expected to learn dispensing procedures and other operations necessary for the successful delivery of pharmaceutical services in these practice environments.  Students are assigned to a community pharmacy for one semester and to a hospital pharmacy in another semester.  Case studies session are held that integrate subject matter in didactic coursework in the second professional year,

PHA 5944CIPPE IV. Spring semester; Credit: 1; Prerequisites: PD classification. This is the second course in the sequence with the activities as described in Practicum III.  Students are assigned to community or hospital pharmacies with supervision by pharmacists.

(*IPPE = Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experiences)

PHA 5113 Drug Therapy Monitoring and Pharmacogenomics. Fall semester; Credits: 2; Prerequisites: PD classification. This course covers biochemical analytical techniques, clinical interpretation of laboratory data, fundamentals of applied therapeutic drug monitoring, and pharmacogenomics principles and applications.  All concepts are discussed in the context of applications to patient care.

PHA 5781 Pharmacotherapy I. Spring semester. Credits: 2; Prerequisites: PD classification. This course is designed to introduce the pharmacy student to the study of pharmacotherapy.  It will provide introductory information designed to assist the student to begin understanding the rationale upon which many drug therapy decisions are based.  Principles, concepts, processes, and skills in pharmacotherapy will be emphasized.  Therapeutic topics and case studies will be used to provide students with the opportunity to apply these skills.  Therapeutic topics include introduction to gastrointestinal, respiratory, cardiovascular, endocrine, and infectious diseases.  This is a student-centered learning course designed to begin the process of life long learning for you as a health care professional.

PHA 5782 Pharmacotherapy II. Fall semester. Credits: 5; Prerequisites: PD classification. The purpose of this course is to provide didactic framework for the therapeutic management of a number of common diseases, including cardiovascular diseases, renal diseases, diabetic mellitus, psychiatric diseases and pulmonary diseases.  With a thorough background established in pathophysiology, pharmacology, pharmacokinetics and other courses in the curriculum, the goal of this course is to prepare students to develop rational drug therapy plans for patients, identify conditions for monitoring pharmacotherapy in patients, and identify conditions associated with these common diseases that require referral.

PHA 5783 Pharmacotherapy III. Spring semester; Credits: 5; Prerequisites: PD classification; passing grade in PHA 5782. This is the third course in a sequence of six pharmacotherapy courses in the curriculum. The areas of therapeutic focus in Pharmacotherapy III include; Infectious Diseases. Hematology and Oncology, and Endocrine/Metabolic Disorders. The course will utilize the Case-Assisted Student Centered Learning (CASCL) format to enhance the student’s ability to apply and utilize information in solving problems and/or enhancing patient care with medications.

PHA 5784 Pharmacotherapy IV, Fall, Credits: 3; Prereq: 3PD classification; This course emphasizes the implementation of the professional concepts of pharmaceutical care (PC)  This is the responsible provision of drug therapy to achieve definte outcomes that improve a patient’s quality of life. The intent of this course is to prepare students to take care of patients. Students learn how to collect and interpret data, design, recommend, carry out, monitor, and change patient specific pharmacotherapy. Students also learn how to work in collaboration with each other. These are student-centered learning, performance-based courses that are designed to assist the student in the improvement of several professional skills. These skills are: problem-solving skills, group dynamic skills, interviewing skills, presentation skills, writing skills, and self-evaluation skills. The course presents the didactic content in case scenarios. Most of the content and several of these skills have been presented in previous courses. The emphasis is on learning and practice.

 

PHA 5787 Pharmacotherapy V, Spring. Credits: 3; Prereq: 3PD classification; This course emphasizes the implementation of the professional concepts of pharmaceutical care (PC)  This is the responsible provision of drug therapy to achieve definte outcomes that improve a patient’s quality of life. The intent of this course is to prepare students to take care of patients. Students learn how to collect and interpret data, design, recommend, carry out, monitor, and change patient specific pharmacotherapy. Students also learn how to work in collaboration with each other. These are student-centered learning, performance-based courses that are designed to assist the student in the improvement of several professional skills. These skills are: problem-solving skills, group dynamic skills, interviewing skills, presentation skills, writing skills, and self-evaluation skills. The course presents the didactic content in case scenarios. Most of the content and several of these skills have been presented in previous courses. The emphasis is on learning and practice.

PHA 5788 Pharmacotherapy VI, Spring semester (last 8 weeks); Credits: 2; Prerequisites: 4PD classification; successful completion of the previous Pharmacotherapy course series and  the entire clinical clerkship course series. Pharmacotherapy VI is intended to provide the post-clerkship student with an opportunity to assimilate and combine their didactic and clinical knowledge through real-life patient case presentations. Students are paired in teams of two to deliver patient topic presentations including the defense of their recommendations from both peer and faculty questioning. The patient case presentation format allows the student to incorporate various elements of their pharmacy training to demonstrate that they can deliver a high level of pharmaceutical care after graduation. A description of the course along with its innovative design and documented impact is published in American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education 2003;67 (4): 110-117.

PHA 5108L Pharmaceutical Skills Laboratory I. Fall. Credits: 2; Prereq: 3PD classification. This is the first course in a two-semester sequence of an interdisciplinary laboratory experience that will integrate concepts related to common pharmaceutical products, patient assessment, laboratory tests, precautions and limitations, home monitoring devices, case study integration/presentation of products, and teaching how to use medications, answer patient questions, and enhance adherence. This laboratory course has been designed in a modular format and will complement concurrent courses in the semester.  The overall design of the course is to provide the student with the important skills, experiences, and patient assessment techniques prior to entering clerkship rotations.  Emphasis is place on the monitoring of blood pressure, cholesterol, diabetes, asthma, women’s health, nutrition, INR, and adherence with medications, unusual dosage forms, and smoking cessation programs.

PHA 5109L Pharmaceutical Skills Laboratory II. Spring. Credits: 1; Prereq: 3PD classification; PHA 5108L Pharmaceutical Skills Laboratory I. This is the second course in a two-semester sequence of an interdisciplinary laboratory experience that emphasizes compounding of traditional dosage forms and  preparation of sterile dosage forms.

PHA 5644, PHA 5645, PHA 5646, PHA 5647, PHA 5648, PHA 5649, PHA 5659, PHA 5661, PHA 5662, PHA 5663, PHA 5665 Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience courses. Fall, Spring, Summer semesters; Credit: 4 each; Prerequisites: PD classification; successful completion of all required pharmacy didactic coursework in the PharmD curriculum prior to the last 8 weeks of the spring semester of the third professional year.  These courses provide the student with a variety of opportunities to implement pharmaceutical care services under the supervision of approved professional preceptors in different health care environments and settings.  The goal of these courses is to develop the clinical competencies necessary for the graduate to practice pharmacy competently and confidently.  Students utilize their pharmacy educational background to take care of patients’ medication needs such that their quality of life is improved.  Students are required to interview patients and their families; organize health care data; monitor patients’ responses to medication treatment; identify clinical problems with medications; research the pharmaceutical and medical literature; make rational, evidenced based recommendations; answer questions about medications; prepare and distribute medications accurately and efficiently; and communicate effectively with preceptors, fellow pharmacy students, other health care students and health care providers.

 

 

Department of Pharmaceutical Outcomes and Policy

 

PHA 5719 Introduction to Quantitative Methods in Pharmacy, Fall semester; Credits: 3; Prerequisites: PD classification.  This course provides students with the knowledge and skills needed to read, interpret, and evaluate quantitative findings found in pharmacy and medical literatures.  It emphasizes recognizing and applying the correct quantitative methods to assist in professional practice decision-making.

 

PHA 5727 Introduction to Pharmacist, Pharmaceutical and the Health Care System Fall semester; Credits: 3; Prerequisites: PD classification. This course deals with the contemporary experience of illness in the US along with the people, organizations and systems that provide health care services.  Topics include consideration of the quality and cost of medical care with a particular focus on pharmaceutical therapy.  The course incorporates an introduction to laws, regulations and ethics applicable to the practice of pharmacy.

PHA 5742C Professional Communications in Pharmacy Practice. Spring semester; Credits: 2; Prerequisites: PD classification and passing grades in PHA 5517 and PHA 5783. Patient-centered communication and colleague-centered communication.  Skills inclusive of empathy and assertiveness taught that are specific to functions pharmacists perform in practice such as interview and assessment of a medication history, patient education about medications, and interactions with other health care providers.

PHA 5226 Evidenced-Based Pharmacy. Fall semester; Credits: 4; Prerequisites: PD classification, passing grade in PHA 5719 or instructor permission. The course includes methods for evaluation and improvement of drug therapy outcomes including critical appraisal of drug and clinical service literature, and quality assessment and improvement techniques with special focus on patient and medication safety.

PHA 5239 Pharmacy Law and Ethics. Fall semester; Credits: 3; Prerequisites: PD classification. This course describes the governmental framework within which pharmacy is practiced.  The legal and ethical basis of pharmacy practice are emphasized.  Best pharmacy practices and managed care approaches are presented and discussed.

PHA 5267 Critical Appraisal of Pharmacoeconomics Studies. Spring semester (first 8 weeks); Credits: 1; Prerequisites: PD classification. This course provides an introduction to the principles of pharmaco-economics, and the methods for the evaluation of pharmaco-economic studies.

Date: DEC 2010  H:groupStudent AffairsAcademic AffairsCourse Descriptions required 2010